Sumo Citrus

February 18, 2019

I love shopping for healthy foods to keep on-hand in my kitchen and especially for ones that are sweet with a good shelf life. I am so glad I found out about these because they are exactly that and always hit the spot. Plus, they don't make any mess!

 

Did anyone else grow up in school getting an orange in their lunch box...or as a sideline snack at sports? Well, haha I did and still do enjoy them as a fresh treat to this day! I have been buying mandarins at the grocery store for years now, but could NOT believe my eyes when I found the version that Sumo Citrus produces there.

 

They are unlike no other seedless mandarin I've ever had!!!

 

 

 

First of all, they are definitely the biggest and second, the absolute easiest to peel! They are giant and have this special top knot on the top of them (hints the name) that acts as a perfect pull tab for you to grab onto. I love it and since this fruit is only offered seasonally, I like to get my hands on them while I can.

 

Sumo Citrus has a neat story behind it too, which makes this yummy fruit even more special. This particular citrus wasn't easy to develop in the first place, in fact it took almost 30 years and some tough challenges along the way. Thankfully though, the results turned out very sweet and rewarding! 

 

Long story short, a citrus grower in the 1970's in Japan strived to combine his techniques with those of the sweet navel California oranges. He worked hard for years to create and perfect this success. When he was done, it became the most prized citrus fruit in Japan and Korea, and to this day the fruit is given as a cherished gift there between friends. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

They are developed so uniquely and that is exactly why this type of citrus may not look perfect on the outside, but don't worry, they still taste amazing on the inside! These have a different kind of bright, bumpy, and loose peeling. It is what makes them so simple to peel and enjoy. 

 

I also always love to know where my food is sourced from and in case you do too, this fruit is grown with the same high standards that the legendary Japanese farmer had today on Sumo Citrus's family farm. It is located California's San Joaquin Valley and that is where they are tree-ripened and hand picked. They are especially tender because of this, so if you see any blemishes if you go to purchase them at your local store, don't fret!

 

 

 

 

I personally hate buying and washing fruit, so these have been a easy option to keep in the fridge because they last so long. Sumo Citrus is non-GMO and very low in acid. They are also a good source of Vitamin C and Fiber. Not to mention, they contain potassium, folate, and other vitamins and minerals. 

 

I definitely plan to keep them on my shopping list until the end of their season in April! For those who live in Charlotte too that are curious, I have bought them at both Whole Foods and at The Fresh Market here in town. You can visit their website to find the closest shops with them in your area  ------ just click here.

 

 

 

 

Orange you glad I told you about Sumo? Well, eat one of these fruits if you haven't already and I think you will be agreeing!  They are bursting with flavor and could be a great new addition to the fruits you are buying. I saw this quote on Instagram the other day that said "Health is wealth" and I truly agree with that statement.

 

Let's continue to motivate each other this new year and treat our bodies the way they deserve by making sure we are eating enough fresh foods daily! These really do make it easier to incorporate that.

 

Hope everyone had a good and productive Monday so far. Going to link Sumo's Insta right here in case you want to follow and find more out about the brand!

 

 

Xoxo,

Rachel

 

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